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Starman 1967

Pro's and con's of each scope type. Loosing the will to live trying to decide.

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Starman 1967

Can any body tell me the differences between theses scope types. Pro's and con's? Which is best for what use? 

maksutov

newtonian

maksutov - newtonian hybrid.

dobsonian

I'm loosing the will to live trying to decide what to look into buying.

 

 

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Brantuk

Newtonians - most basic of all - just a tube with a mirror at the end of it. First designed by Isaac Newton - give best bang for your buck cos refractors and cassegraines cost an awful lot more per aperture inch. Larger apertures can peer deeper into space - as such Newts can get very large and usually they're mounted on a Dobsonian base for larger than than 8" diameter. A dob is just a rocker box on a turntable so unsuitable for imaging without modifications like a "barn door tracker" - otherwise a huge EQ mount is required.

 

Cassegraines produce a long focal length in a shorter tube by bouncing the light up and down the tube several times. This makes them great for viewing and imaging planets. They are closed tubes with a meniscus lens at the front (Mak's) or a corrector plate (Sct's) which are highly prone to dewing (so a dew control system is necessary). They have high focal ratios (eg f10) making deep sky captures a lengthy process (twice as long as an f5 refractor).

 

An 8" Newtonian on HEQ5 is a great combo - best of both worlds and super for both imaging and observing planets and deep sky. Unless you wanna spend thousands on a glass refractor. I'll let someone else do Mak Newts - they baffle me a bit too other than they're well known for imaging applications. :)

Edited by Brantuk

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Starman 1967
5 minutes ago, Brantuk said:

Newtonians - most basic of all - just a tube with a mirror at the end of it. First designed by Isaac Newton - give best bang for your buck cos refractors and cassegraines cost an awful lot more per aperture inch. Larger apertures can peer deeper into space - as such Newts can get very large and usually they're mounted on a Dobsonian base higher than 8" diameter. A dob is just a rocker box on a turntable so unsuitable for imaging without modifications like a "barn door tracker" - otherwise a huge EQ mount is required.

 

Cassegraines produce a long focal length in a shorter tube by bouncing the light up and down the tube several times. This makes them great for viewing and imaging planets. They are closed tubes with a meniscus lens at the front (Mak's) or a corrector plate (Sct's) which are highly prone to dewing (so a dew control system is necessary). They have high focal ratios (eg f10) making deep sky captures a lengthy process (twice as long as an f5 refractor).

 

An 8" Newtonian on HEQ5 is a great combo - best of both worlds and super for both imaging and observing planets and deep sky. Unless you wanna spend thousands on a glass refractor. I'll let someone else do Mak Newts - they baffle me a bit too other than they're well known for imaging applications. :)

Cheers kim

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tuckstar

Depends what you want to do/look at. Alot of us have both, a frac or sct for planets and dobsonian mounted newt for deep sky. If you want to get into astrophotography (the darkside) then its all about having a good sturdy mount. Best thing to do is come along to a meet and have a look and play with some kit see what takes your fancy.

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Starman 1967

I'm looking at getting the heq5 mount just working out the best scope for me. I'm total newb when it comes to scopes. No idea what's easy to set up or maintain.  Need a good all rounder so I can do a bit of every thing. 

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Starman 1967

I'm hoping to come along to wymswold on Saturday night. 

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Werisit

What ever you buy, you'll find it doesn't do everything you want. That's why, if you look at the signatures on here, you'll see most of us have a variety of scopes to cover different requirements. But, in my opinion, a Newtonian is probably the best all rounder. It's good advice to get along to a meet and have a look at and through a variety scopes and mounts. 

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Rusty Strings

If you just want to look at stuff....

 

I would say an 8" newtonian on a dob mount is the best first scope. It's reasonably portable, doesn't take up too much storage space and if it's your first scope, it will knock your socks off!. Like you, I laboured for ages over this and ended up with 8" newt on an EQ mount. The scope was and still is, excellent, but as a visual only guy, I soon tired of setting up the eq mount.Plus there are quirks of eq mounts, like the way the eyepiece position moves as you aim at different parts of the sky, which you fix by loosening the tube rings and rotating the tube until the eyepiece is better positioned. Easy fixed but when its cold, dark and you have gloves on, it's a lot of a faff. I looked at dob mounts and being good with wood I made one and the scope has never been one with the eq mount since ( I now use the eq for a small refractor). The so called down side of a dob is having to hand follow objects around the sky, frankly, I never found myself wishing it could track, its just not a problem.

 

If want to image or think you may later......

 

Get the same scope on the HEQ5. Yes you'll find the mount annoying when all you want is to look at the moon for half an hour, but there are many that have imaged with an 8"newt with excellent results and later got a small refractor when you're further up the learning curve.

 

I think a first scope buyer naturally wants to get the one scope that will last forever. Just try to decide what you want to do now, it does make the choice easier IMHO. 

Edited by Rusty Strings

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Sunny Phil

I'm guessing from the fact you have an HEQ5, you don't have a small budget. As others have said, it depends on what your primary interest is. You also need to decide how often and for how long you'll use your 'scope. Apart from being on the poor side of average, one reason I don't have kit to look at deep sky stuff is that weather and where I live mean that I get about 12-15 (lately rather less) really clear nights a year. On the other hand the Moon can be viewed at times when even Jupiter is invisible. For that reason, amongst others, most of my observing is solar and lunar. I also have back trouble from time to time, so have a 127mm Maksutov, 80mm short tube refractor and Coronado PST. I have a DSLR, which I sometimes attach to the "Mak" for solar and lunar photography but also do a lot of shots with the camera lenses, too. I also use 15x70 binoculars a lot.

 

I think an 8" Newt is a good idea but if you are more likely to be viewing and snapping planets, a Mak might be better.

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