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Sunny Phil

Best of my Perseids so far

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Sunny Phil
On ‎15‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 11:21, stash said:

What with and how did you capture these Phil

Hi Clive, the "trade secret" is in my blog. I use my Nikon D3200 at ISO 6400 18mm FL and 5 seconds exposure. I've found I'm catching many more meteors this way. I have used 30 seconds exposure at ISO 400 or 800 and captured some meteors and also captured meteors while photographing star trails. The downside is that it takes 5 seconds between exposures.

On ‎15‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 21:13, Tweedledee said:

Very nice Phil, and lots of stars. :thumbsup:

Thanks, Pete. To capture the stars, I prefer an ISO of 800 or 400 (depending on conditions) and 30 seconds exposure. This only captures the brightest meteor, though.

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Johnnyaardvark

Very nice shots good colours on the meteors [emoji106]

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

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Johnnyaardvark

Hi again...

Re: 5 seconds between exposures.

My D5000 has long exposure noise reduction and turning this off made a big difference to the time between taking long exposures. Is this something the D3200 has?

Agree with you on the shorter exposures and higher ISO though. Nice for picking up the fainter ones.

S

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

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Orion

Nice pictures.  I've started to to think that the longer exposures picks up sky background and possibly obliterates some meteor trails. But shorter exposures would be less intense density and faint meteors might have a better chance of not being swamped.  High iso and short exp.

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Sunny Phil
On ‎20‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 00:03, Orion said:

Nice pictures.  I've started to to think that the longer exposures picks up sky background and possibly obliterates some meteor trails. But shorter exposures would be less intense density and faint meteors might have a better chance of not being swamped.  High iso and short exp.

For longer exposures you need a lower ISO. As you say, longer exposures at high ISO give lots of sky background. For constellations, low ISO and long exposures give the best results but the opposite is true for meteors.

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