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Just how much water is there up there.


Graham
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It has now been raining pretty much constantly since Sunday. 

Ok some of it has been light but last night made up for those times with a vengeance. 

All the drainage for roads in the town cried enough and by the time I went to work at 5 30 am this morning there was flood water covering the black stuff. 

In places by the docks it was up to the sills on my motor and I have a freelander. :wacko:

Which takes me back to the title. 

Hell Suffolk is supposed to be one of the driest counties. 

What is going on. :frantic:

Edited by Graham
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I think you must have Derbyshires share added into it.

I wouldn't say we've been dry here, but certainly this week we've not had much of it.

 

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That leads me to a conversation I was having with my six year old the other day about water.  Given that (I would suspect) the majority of the water in the Solar System, if not Universe as a whole is ice, is not the default state of water a solid and not as we experience it on the Earths surface the anomallous liquid?  And most other things we experience as gasses (methane and whatnot) in fact liquid.  And don't start me on hydrogen and helium (plasmas).  Note, I say default!

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I think most of it is in gaseous forms in large molecular clouds etc , vacuum in space makes it "boil", not the right word really but you know what i mean.

Think right word is outgas, but not sure :wacko:

 

 

 

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Not sure in space whether it would ever be In The form of ice cos of the zero pressure. :wacko:  beyond my pay grade I think. :lol:  

Edited by Sheila
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19 hours ago, Sheila said:

Not sure in space whether it would ever be In The form of ice cos of the zero pressure. :wacko:  beyond my pay grade I think. :lol:  

Saturns rings... comets, etc.  Also surface of Europa (probably to a fair depth) and other moons.

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On 12/01/2018 at 11:55, Sheila said:

I think most of it is in gaseous forms in large molecular clouds etc , vacuum in space makes it "boil", not the right word really but you know what i mean.

Think right word is outgas, but not sure :wacko:

 

 

22 hours ago, Sheila said:

Not sure in space whether it would ever be In The form of ice cos of the zero pressure. :wacko:  beyond my pay grade I think. :lol:  

I think Sheila is on the right pay grade for this. :thumbsup:

 

Ice or water contained in solar system objects would probably be a drop in the ocean compared to this particular cloud, and there are probably many others similar...

https://www.fastcompany.com/1769468/scientists-discover-oldest-largest-body-water-existence-space

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I haven't been able to see anything for over a week. Finishing work late with no time to observe doesn't help either.

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