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newtyng5

UHC or OIII

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newtyng5

Just a quick question.

I have been thinking for a while about getting a UHC filter, but wondering whether an OIII filter would be an idea. (visual only)

This UHC (the 2" version) or Televue UHC (2")

This OIII (the 2"version)

I know they pricey but Astronomik and televue are quality.

Just wondered your thoughts about UHC v OIII and also whether the cheapo filters are any good, as I have read good and bad.

OVL cheap UHC.

 

Cheers!

 

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Tweedledee

You will find that both O111 and UHC are very useful to bring out different features in different nebulae. If you can only manage one at this time then the O111 might just have a slight edge in usefulness. In rubbish uk skies I think the difference between the expensive and the cheap will be lost, but you may get a minute almost imperceptible improvement spending 3 times as much. Call me cheap skate but I'd get both a cheaper O111 and UHC for less than the price of just one Televue. You may find they become a bit of a novelty that you eventually don't (or forget to) use much. That's my 2p worth. 🙂

Edited by Tweedledee

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BAZ

I have to say from a personal standpoint, I would go UHC on most objects. This is from my observations on what would be considered prime OIII territory.

A good example would be the veil nebula. For me the OIII does increase the contrast, but makes the whole view too dark, where the UHC brought the object out and also showed some of the finer filament detail within the two larger structures.

It is for me very difficult to navigate round with an OIII as it darkens even larger stars, the UHC lets some of the starlight through, so it's usable without having to find the object and then fit either the filter or an eyepiece with a filter after finding it, it saves time and mucking about and allows more time on the objects.

 

The OIII has a place too though, on something like a small planetary nebula, they isolate them by pretty much just letting them through when they sit in a tight starfield. If you know you are in the right area, the object can just pop straight out and isolates it from the stars which confuse things finding it.

 

I also had a muck about stacking filters too, a Neodymium and a UHC worked well on the NAN and Veil. It's horses for courses on what suits your eye's and how much detail you perceive them to bring out the object or finer detail you are looking for. 

 

My UHC and OIII are both Skywatcher ones and work fine for me, but then my eyesight isn't the best. 

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Tweedledee

Stacking a Neodymium, that's interesting Martyn. Never tried that but will have to experiment. 👍

 

I personally don't enjoy the view with these nebula filters very much because, as Martyn says, the stars are dimmed and the fainter ones just disappear altogether in the filter. However when it comes to the difference between seeing the nebula or not seeing it, or just teasing out a bit more extended detail they can be really useful.

 

I often use them to blink an object in and out passing the filter between the eye and the eyepiece, assuming plenty of eye relief. If it gives a better view, I then screw it onto the eyepiece barrel for a longer inspection.

 

All my filters are the cheaper versions and they are fine in my opinion. If you are up that mountain in mag 7 skies with a big dob then I'm sure the expensive ones would really excel.

Edited by Tweedledee

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Daz Type-R

I cannot argue with any of the above and personally I bought middle of the road filters as I intended to keep them for a long time, so thought why not chuck a bit of cash at them.

 

I also went for the 2" size of filters.

 

These are the ones I have got, which you can try out if we ever get to a meet at the same time......

 

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/uhc-oiii-visual-filters/baader-oiii-filter.html

 

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/uhc-oiii-visual-filters/baader-uhc-s-filter.html

 

I dont use them as much as I probably should but they have made the difference between me seeing something and not in the past.

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newtyng5

Thanks loads for the info.

I remember when tony had an oIII filter, I wasn't impressed by it, mainly for the reasons Baz mentioned. But probably I am now realising it's more of a specialised piece of equipment, rather than 'use it for almost every object' .

If/when I get a UHC or OIII I doubt I will use it much, which is another reason I put off buying one (and another reason to get a cheaper version I think).

Food for thought.

Cheers

 

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tuckstar

I've used my 0lll filter (thanks Tony, sorry Rob) a few times now and pretty much as above. I tried it on the witches broom and thought the view was better with out. Still have a list of planetary nebulae to try with it though. Just need the chance to use it more.

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philjay

Plus 1 for O3. Ive had a lumicon for years and I think Ive still got a UHC somewhere but its not in the ep box like the O3.

With filters its horses for courses, O3 I use predominently on planetary but sime open nebula are O3 rich, try one on m42, its good.

See if you cant get a gkeg through each at a meet sometime and see which work fir you and what you want to look at.

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