Jump to content

We politely request that members refrain from discussing politics and/or the Brexit debate on East Midlands Stargazers. Let's keep it to the topic at hand... Clouds. ☁️

  • Join the online East Midlands astronomy club today!

    Test

Sign in to follow this  
Sunny Phil

Beatlejuice

Recommended Posts

Sunny Phil

I cannot remember where I saw this but it has faded quite noticeably recently. I happened to see Orion last night and it appeared fainter than Pollux but brighter than Bellatrix and Castor, suggesting a magnitude of 1.2 to 1.25. I think my eyes suffer from over-sensitivity to red light, so others might find it closer in brightness to Bellatrix and Castor than I do.

 

Some have suggested that it might be about to go supernova but another explanation might be that it has expelled clouds of "soot".

 

Another guess (mine) is that it may have fused nearly all of its helium and is about to fuse carbon, nitrogen and oxygen and moving to another stage in its evolution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brantuk

Yep I noticed the other night it wasn't as red in appearance as it usually is. It certainly made me wonder if it's about to collapse then go SN. But then, how long would that take, and how long would it take the light to reach us here on Earth? Watch this space.... lol 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
philjay

Theres certainly a lot of stuff about this at tge moment, especially on sosheeal meejah. Its a variable star so is moving towards a minima. Suppose because its one of the winter bright stars and is relatively easy to spot even from light polluted skies it,s getting more press this time round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sunny Phil
4 hours ago, philjay said:

Theres certainly a lot of stuff about this at tge moment, especially on sosheeal meejah. Its a variable star so is moving towards a minima. Suppose because its one of the winter bright stars and is relatively easy to spot even from light polluted skies it,s getting more press this time round.

It has the distinction of being the brightest variable star in the sky. I have seen various estimates for its range. I follow it, although one won't notice much change from night to night. I have seen estimates as faint as mag 1.3 but even my estimate of 1.2 is outside of its normal range. I have seen it as faint as Pollux before (again outside of its "official" range) but never noticeably fainter. Pollux is a great comparison star because it is of similar colour and doesn't vary much. I often compare it to Rigel and Procyon when it is at/near its brightest but the colour contrast makes things difficult, especially if one perceives red as brighter than most people. Aldebaran (mag 0.9) is useful as a general guide for comparison but I am in a minority that considers Aldebaran to be variable, albeit with a small range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sunny Phil

The latest twist to the tale is that I think it has brightened a bit to around mag 1.2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.