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The Milky Way from my garden 😊


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3 hours ago, Bottletopburly said:

That’s excellent 👍

assuming no flats taken 

Thanks 😊 


No, I didn’t take any calibration files as I didn’t know you had to when just using a camera and lens. 🙈
My Milky Way guy said darks/bias frames might help but he doesn’t take them?

I might try next time though to see what difference it makes 😊

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2 hours ago, BAZ said:

That's impressive, personally I like the tree, it gives a bit of scale.

Thanks 😊 

 

I was hoping to get more foreground in but the angle was wrong. I thought it looked a bit random with just a bit of a tree 😂

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2 hours ago, Clive said:

The North America nebula stands out quite nicely.

Where about’s is that?

Someone else reeled of what they could see but I don’t know what/where anything is 😊

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Bino-viewer

Top left in the tree image. The pink bit and looks like the North American continent, with Mexico below.

It aka NGC 7000 

The bright star just to the right of it is Deneb, in Cygnus. (I think)

 

Did you use any filters Alison ?

 

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4 hours ago, alis80b said:

Thanks 😊 

... I might try next time though to see what difference it makes ...

You should be able to take flats, darks and bias frames at anytime and apply them to the existing images.

 

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5 hours ago, Bino-viewer said:

Top left in the tree image. The pink bit and looks like the North American continent, with Mexico below.

It aka NGC 7000 

The bright star just to the right of it is Deneb, in Cygnus. (I think)

 

Did you use any filters Alison ?

 

Ahh thanks. I can see it! 😊

 

I’m guessing if I took a photo of the North American nebula through my telescope it would be much bigger? I can’t really get an idea of scale yet.

 

No I didn’t use a filter. Just my camera and lens. I have got an Optolong L-Pro filter attached to my reducer on my telescope though. 
 

😊

 

 

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2 hours ago, Glafnazur said:

That's brilliant Alison, and another vote for the tree image👍

Thanks 😊

Next time I try I hope it has moved in the sky a bit so I can get more foreground in 😊

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1 hour ago, Clive said:

You should be able to take flats, darks and bias frames at anytime and apply them to the existing images.

 

Ahh thanks. I thought the darks had to be taken at the same temperature as when taking the photos. I’ve read mixed things online.

Some people seem to use them all the time and some people don’t bother with any calibration frames with Milky Way/landscape stuff?
I was told I wouldn’t really need to use flats if my sensor and lens are clean.

My lens is brand new and my camera is quite new.

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17 minutes ago, alis80b said:

Ahh thanks. I thought the darks had to be taken at the same temperature as when taking the photos. I’ve read mixed things online.

Some people seem to use them all the time and some people don’t bother with any calibration frames with Milky Way/landscape stuff?
I was told I wouldn’t really need to use flats if my sensor and lens are clean.

My lens is brand new and my camera is quite new.

Yes darks should ideally be at the same temperature as the lights for the optimum effect but if you're imaging under a light polluted sky without using a LP filter then they're not so relevant.  However, I would suggest that flats may help as, even if the lens and camera are perfectly clean, they will still remove any vignetting caused by the lens (I'm not familiar with the Sigma 28-35mm lens so I'm not sure of its vignetting performance on a full frame camera).  Generally the effect of vignetting is insignificant for 'normal' photography but once you start applying a typical astrophotography 'stretch' to an image it becomes much more apparent. 

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59 minutes ago, Clive said:

Yes darks should ideally be at the same temperature as the lights for the optimum effect but if you're imaging under a light polluted sky without using a LP filter then they're not so relevant.  However, I would suggest that flats may help as, even if the lens and camera are perfectly clean, they will still remove any vignetting caused by the lens (I'm not familiar with the Sigma 28-35mm lens so I'm not sure of its vignetting performance on a full frame camera).  Generally the effect of vignetting is insignificant for 'normal' photography but once you start applying a typical astrophotography 'stretch' to an image it becomes much more apparent. 

Thank you for the advice. I appreciate it 😊

 

I’m not sure on the lens to be honest. I only bought it last week following advice and recommendations from a few people who have a full frame camera and take amazing photos of the Milky Way. 
 

There was a tiny bit of vignetting in those images I took but I managed to process it out. 
I’m sure as I use it more I’ll have more of an idea 😊

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