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How do we know the "Big Bang" happened?


Craig
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/20932483


 


When we look at the night sky, the stars we can see are within our own galaxy. But there are also some fuzzy patches which we need a telescope to see clearly. These are other galaxies like our own - but they are much, much further away than the stars.

 


If we look closely at these galaxies, we'd expect that some would be moving towards us and some would be moving away, But in fact, almost all galaxies are moving away from us - some at very high speeds indeed.


 


We know the galaxies are moving away because of an effect called red-shift - similar to the way that a car sounds more high-pitched as it approaches you, and low-pitched as it moves away.


 


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Guest Madatter

I'm beginning to have doubts, the farther we look the more we see, only the other week there was a photo off a fully formed galaxy at the edge of the universe, we just seem to keep moving the edge back.

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It's only been quoted at 13.7 billion years as that's how far we can see back. Give it another few years and a new scope or technique comes along and we can now see 15.7 billion years back.


 


We are always learning and pushing the boundaries of space back.


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With what can only be described as an ever expanding universe, there will always be something new to learn. As mentioned, as our resorces improve I'm sure we'll see the universe is far bigger than we currently are able to detect or estimate. I say estimate as we are finding new things that redefine what we thought all the time.


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Guest Kheldar
infinite i think the word is you are looking for :)

 

Nope, that would require some concrete proof : big is the perfect word there I think :P

 

Also if you want to be really picky, space may be limited : the Universe may be infinite :P

Edited by Kheldar
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No, space is a vacuum.

Good point that Mike,

But is it a vacuum because all the dense air for want of a better word  was blown outwards by the force of the big bang.

If this is the case the outer edge of the universe would still be a shock wave and thus still be carrying the sound.

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A vacuum is something that is not made up of particles/atoms etc, so the Big Bang was just throwing atoms etc out into a vacuum and the preceding shock wave of the vacuum is expanding into another vacuum so would make no sound....……

I think.

Astro physics etc gives me brain ache.

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But also look at it this way, if a tree falls over in a wood and there is nobody to hear it, does it make a sound?

It generates a sound wave, it only becomes a sound per say if there is some sort of detector ;)

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Nope, that would require some concrete proof : big is the perfect word there I think :P

 

Also if you want to be really picky, space may be limited : the Universe may be infinite :P

only limited in your mind sweetie :wub:

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Guest Kheldar
Umm, the bang wasn't a bang though - there's no shock or bow wave, space is simply expanding (allegedly) :)

as i said at first....theory :)

Better than some theories :lol:

Steady state anyone?

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Guest Kheldar
I thought the steady state theory had been discredited?

It's another theory, that was my only point :) They are all just theories at the end of the day until we can imperially prove them!

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I was under the impression that it was a theory still?

 

So is gravity but I don't see you jumping out of a tall building without a parachute or tether. ;)

 

If you are interested, I would recommend a book called "A Universe From Nothing" by Lawrence Kraus that is pretty compelling.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1471112683

  • ISBN-10: 1471112683

ISBN-13: 978-1471112683

The science can be heavy going at times but it's well worth a read. It's not just theories, but observations too, which makes it all the more convincing.

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