Jump to content
  • Join the online East Midlands astronomy club today!

    With active forums, two dark sites and a knowledgeable membership, East Midlands Stargazers has something for everyone.

Moonlite focuser hex bolt size.


Daz Type-R
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,


 


Does anybody know what size allen key I would need for the collimation screws on the Moonlite focuser.


 


I managed to make a allen key I had fit the 4 fixing screws but after trying all my allen keys, none of them fit the collimation screws.


 


I know from a previous thread that they are imperial compared to the proper measuring system (metric) ;)


 


Also, Felix, if you are reading this, tried to PM you but it says you cant receive any new messages, time for a clear out :lol:


 


Need to get my set-up ready for the 18th!


 


Cheers guys and gals.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

"they are imperial compared to the proper measuring system (metric)"


 


Everyone knows we invented imperial long before metric cos it's superior. The Europeans invented metric cos they can't do maths unless it divides by ten so they can use their fingers and thumbs. :lol:


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, got an Allen key that fits now, so how do I know if my focuser needs collimating or my primary/secondary needs collimating or does it not matter, just as long as the laser is on the donught on the primary and is bang on the centre spot on my Baader collimator?


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also make the image of your secondary as circular as possible and make sure all your primary mirror clips are visible this way you will be able to tell if your secondary is in the right place.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry Mick, are you saying that if the laser is spot on and I can see the 3 mirror cell clips then jobs a good un regardless of what part of my setup I collimated?


Edited by Daz Type-R
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basically if you can see all three mirror clips and the secondary appears circular then the secondary mirror is aligned correctly under the focuser. The next part is to align the focuser axis by adjusting the tilt of the secondary mirror, this is done with your baader collimator by adjusting the secondary screws until the dot is in the middle of the donut, this basically aligns everything up so the focuser can move in and out and make no difference to the collimation.


 


The final part is then aligning the primary mirror by adjusting the primary collimation screws until the red dot goes through the etched panel hole on your baader collimator.


 


Thats it all done.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you're getting "collimation craze" Daz. It's a well known illness :) where does it stop? Will you be collimating the collimator? And then will you collimate the collimator you used to collimate the collimator?

For me if I look down the draw tube and can see a perfect circle staring back at me (with my eye in the middle of it!) and around the edge of that circle I can see the three mirror clips (all placed evenly) then I just whack the Hotech in then adjust the secondary until the laser is in the centre of the white centre circle. Then I look at where the laser is pointing on the cross hair of the Hotech and adjust the bolts on the primary until the laser dot disappears down the central hole of the cross hair on the Hotech. The key thing really I guess is having the collimating device centred to start with, but the Hotech is self centering so that bit is sorted for me. Is it the same with the Baader laser collimators?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Kheldar

Ok, got an Allen key that fits now, so how do I know if my focuser needs collimating or my primary/secondary needs collimating or does it not matter, just as long as the laser is on the donught on the primary and is bang on the centre spot on my Baader collimator?

 

I would be in shock if it did not arrive in perfect collimation to be honest Daz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Kheldar

I think you're getting "collimation craze" Daz. It's a well known illness :) where does it stop? Will you be collimating the collimator? And then will you collimate the collimator you used to collimate the collimator?

For me if I look down the draw tube and can see a perfect circle staring back at me (with my eye in the middle of it!) and around the edge of that circle I can see the three mirror clips (all placed evenly) then I just whack the Hotech in then adjust the secondary until the laser is in the centre of the white centre circle. Then I look at where the laser is pointing on the cross hair of the Hotech and adjust the bolts on the primary until the laser dot disappears down the central hole of the cross hair on the Hotech. The key thing really I guess is having the collimating device centred to start with, but the Hotech is self centering so that bit is sorted for me. Is it the same with the Baader laser collimators?

 

He needs this I think ;)

 

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/catseye-collimation-tools/catseye-comboset-pro-xlk-xlsk-kits.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ya know I've just looked and there is a thread on astronomy shed about collimating laser collimators!

 

Best way to collimate a collimator is in a lathe.

Put it in the chuck and spin it slowly.

Watch the dot on a distant wall and collimate the collimator until the dot does not move about. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Kheldar

Best way to collimate a collimator is in a lathe.
Put it in the chuck and spin it slowly.
Watch the dot on a distant wall and collimate the collimator until the dot does not move about. :)

 

I used one of these
 
page1_1.jpg

Edited by Kheldar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My collimator has been tested, its spot on.  :thumbsup:


 


As to my original question, it was more out of curiosity than anything else, if collimation is out (which mine was slightly) then do you collimate the focuser or collimatre the primary/secondary, also, if the focuser does not matter, why put collimation screws on it?


 


Thanks for the responses every one, it has given me something to do while at home!


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Kheldar

My collimator has been tested, its spot on.  :thumbsup:

 

As to my original question, it was more out of curiosity than anything else, if collimation is out (which mine was slightly) then do you collimate the focuser or collimatre the primary/secondary, also, if the focuser does not matter, why put collimation screws on it?

 

Thanks for the responses every one, it has given me something to do while at home!

 

You collimate the aspect that is out, each part of the chain is testable in isolation to the rest. Starting at the focuser (ensure it's pointing dead centre on the other side of the tube with no spider in the train) ... working down through secondary, primary, etc, etc. There's no "guesswork" here - each part is testable in it's own right :)

 

Who said the focuser does not matter? That's crazy talk! First job should have been to remove secondary and spider and ensure focuser is pointing bang square opposite side of tube. If you're referring to my comment, that comment was meant to imply that Moonlite's typically (99.9%) don't arrive out of collimation :)

Edited by Kheldar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest twintin

I used lego to collimate my cheap laser collimator as it was way out ! just got some strange looks from my son when i was rooting round in his lego box for the right bits :lol:


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.