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Deepest galaxy cluster ever discovered (so far that is)...


Guest nickyb
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Mind Blowing.... Only half a billion years after the "Big Bang". Sounds a long time but small in the order of things.

Next stage to increase the exposure to capture more distant images....

Thought: photons are still around from creation?

Have a good day or is it a incredibly small spec in time?

Adrian

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Mind Blowing.... Only half a billion years after the "Big Bang". Sounds a long time but small in the order of things.

Next stage to increase the exposure to capture more distant images....

Thought: photons are still around from creation?

 

 

I think the earliest light we can detect is the CMB (cosmic microwave background) which is a few hundred thousand years after 'the big bang'.

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Guest nickyb

I think the earliest light we can detect is the CMB (cosmic microwave background) which is a few hundred thousand years after 'the big bang'.

good call, yes fossil radiation is currently the oldest relic known, or was when I was a student.

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One thing I've always pondered - and I think they answered it last year on SGL 2013, is how can we see light from a source so far away and from so long ago when nothing travels faster than the speed of light??


 


Answers on a postcard...


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One thing I've always pondered - and I think they answered it last year on SGL 2013, is how can we see light from a source so far away and from so long ago when nothing travels faster than the speed of light??

 

Answers on a postcard...

 

Basically if we wait long enough we can see the light from something very far away. For example if something suddenly pops up and emits light from a million light years away, it will take light 1 million years to reach us, so we won't see it for 1 million years, however once 1 million years have passed since it appeared, then we can see the light.

 

The universe is 14.6 billion years old or something like that, so we can see the light from objects that were around very early in the universe, but very far away, as the light is still passing us...

 

I don't know if that answers your question, but I'm not very good at explaining stuff :lol:

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Exactly the point. How big was the universe at that point? The universe must have expanded at a rate faster than the speed of light....

 

If the universe was expanding faster than light, then the light from distant objects would never reach us, it is expanding fast though, which I think causes a red-shift in the light as it travels (as new space is being produced as it travels, because the universe's 'expansion' is caused by new space being created everywhere at the same time)

 

It's confusing stuff and I don't know all the facts, so forgive me if I make no sense/not answering what you want to know :)

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You're right, it is confusing and a lot to get your head around!


 


I think though that because the light does reach us, then we are not moving at, or faster than the speed of light. 


 


My head hurts!  :unsure:


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