Jump to content
  • Join the online East Midlands astronomy club today!

    With active forums, two dark sites and a knowledgeable membership, East Midlands Stargazers has something for everyone.

Viewing the sun with binoculars


Guest tracyg
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have recently bought some of those glasses that you can look at the sun with and was wondering if, when wearing them, can you look at the sun through bins, or would the sun damage the lens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Never done it but I would say NO don't try it.


 


The lens in the binocular could magnify the suns rays so much that it could damage the glasses.


 


Please don't do it.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definitely do not try it! It would be like holding a magnifying glass at the sun and holding paper behind the glass. Mick is right! You can use proper solar filter I the objective lens of the bins though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definitely DONT do that.

It may or may not damage the lenses in the glasses but will almost certainly damage both eyes, possibly permanently.

Most sun filters diminish the brightness by up to 10000 times. Which is fine, if you do that before the light enters into the binoculars or telescope. Even small binoculars may effectively increase the brightness by a few hundred times, so even wearing the glasses it will still be dangerously bright.

I have some proper sun filters that fit over the big end of the bins. But you still have to be careful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definitely not - here's what you need:


 


http://www.firstlightoptics.com/solar-filters/baader-astrosolar-safety-film-nd-50.html


 


You need to put the film over the front lens of the binocs first so most of the sun's energy is removed before the light goes into the binocs. If the sun goes through first, the binocs will overheat and go bang! just after frying your sun glasses, burning your face, and making you permanently blind.


 


Treat the sun with extreme caution. :)


Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you get filters or get the material and make your own, it is a very rewarding branch of the hobby. Although I prefer to photograph the Sun through a telescope,time and weather conditions don't always permit, especially if I am teaching abroad. Checking the sunspots and drawing their positions isn't too difficult.


 


My blog will show you some results but they are interspersed with other images and observations: http://sungazer127mak.blogspot.fr/


 


For images only, check here: http://s197.photobucket.com/user/PhillipPugh/library/Sunspot%20Drawings%202013?sort=3&start=0&page=1


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest peepshow

Definitely not - here's what you need:

 

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/solar-filters/baader-astrosolar-safety-film-nd-50.html

 

You need to put the film over the front lens of the binocs first so most of the sun's energy is removed before the light goes into the binocs.

I have just bought that film but to use on a camera.  It looks so flimsy that I would be very apprehensive trusting both eyes with it on bins.

Maybe a micro pin hole might develop after time and use.  Could you see it by checking each time?  I dunno.

 But better a pixel to fry in my camera than part of my precious macula.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have this for use on my 5" frac, and it works fine. If you make filters for the bino's, just make sure that what you fit over the lens is a decent fit and won't fall off. 


 


The film is made by Baader, so is of good quality. You can check for holes by holding it up to bright light and making sure there are no holes before using it.


 


Iam not sure, but apparently there are few if any, pain receptors in the retina, so you could be doing real and irreversible damage to your eye without feeling anything.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a Baader Solar film filter with my Meg72 scope. I check it for pinholes every time it comes out - better safe than sorry.


 


After use I replace the cover on it and store safely in a box and in a flight case. I'm always in attendance when it's used (mostly at star parties) to ensure nobody else messes with it or hurts themselves, and to make sure it doesn't dislodge in a breeze.


 


Can't be too careful. :)


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote from me for the Baader solar film. 


I had my homemade filter out the other day which fits on to my binoculars and viewed these amazing sunspots that are currently visible.


 


The filter has served me well : i made it 10 years ago in preparation for the 2004 Venus transit.


 


I'll echo what others have stated : just make sure the film is intact, no pinholes or blemishes, and that it fits well and won't fall or blow off.


As Kim says, you can't be too careful. 


Be safe  :thumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.