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Toucam Pro Adaptor


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Having got myself a Skywatcher 200pds and been very impressed with some fine sights of Jupiter so far, I've decided to dig my old Toucam Pro webcam out and have a play with some imaging. The only problem now being I cannot find the Mogg adaptor to go with it.

Does anybody out there know where I can get hold of one? The usual google search is not giving me many options. I've posted in the wanted section if you'd rather reply there.

I've been using the 12mm Celestron Xcel for viewing Jupiter which have been very good. I have however been advised to get a 5mm BST explorer for higher magnification. One is now on order and should arrive tomorrow, can't wait to hopefully pick out a bit more detail and even the GRS!

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Thanks for the info. When I first got my webcam (almost 10 years ago), it seemed to be known as a Mogg adaptor.

Brantuk - The one FLO are selling looks exactly the same, I'll try and get a price.

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Thanks for the link, looks like just the job and with the infra red filter included. Any clever people out there know why the filter is a requirement when imaging?

IR blocking filters are required to stop IR bleed. Basically the IR wavelength combines with visible light colours and creates a colour shift. IR filters also help with atmospheric dispersion. The IR filter also helps keep each channel RGB pure. So of you needed to separate each colour channel using an IR filter means that when it came to separating say the blue and the red channel the blue channel would not contain light from the IR spectrum and would not have a blurred appearance.

That is what my understanding is anyway :) Hope that helps.

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The infrared which some things emit will stimulate the sensor, but the visible light from the same object may not come from the same place on that object, so there is a risk that the IR light will stimulate pixels which visible light wouldn't, and add such add a type of noise to the image, reducing the sharpness of your detail of the visible light data. Ibbo has recently posted an IR image of Jupiter and I have been amazed at how much IR it emits. I was always skeptical that there was much IR from Jupiter, but that image alone has proved I was wrong. I am interested to over laying the IR with the visible light images he has made, and see what "surface" details the IR is coming from, or if there is no relationship at all.


 


So the IR cut filter should mean you get sharper images, though for smaller scopes I suspect there will be lots of other factors which also contribute to limiting the ability to discern fine detail. If you get one with a filter, you could do a with and without IR-cut filter for comparison and show us the results :)


 


JD

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Thanks for the explanations. I'll try out some imaging both with and without the IR filter if I can. Will be interesting to see if there really is a noticeable difference. I'll post my first attempts, can't wait to have a go.

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I think you'll definitely see a difference. I am thinking if purchasing an IR pass filter to see what detail is extractable on planets in IR. If it is good I would combine the IR with the original colour image (somehow!) and see what I get.

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