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Eye Pieces


Guest heavensabove
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Guest heavensabove

In my short time on this site, I have seen a lot about how eye pieces make a big difference to scopes. With that in mind, I would welcome any comments about what constitutes quality eye pieces plus suggestions for which brand to buy. I am assuming that my scope, when I do buy one, will come with 10 mm and 25 mm but for visual work, do I need others?


 


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The eyepieces supplied will be ok to get you going, but a good eyepiece can make your scope perform so much better. eyepieces can be a very personal thing, best thing to do is come along to a meet and have a try if other people's till you find one that works for you.

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I agree with Andy, what might suit someone else might not work for you. The more money you chuck at it doesn't always guarantee good results either, but it helps.


 


Try some out and see what you think, other members will be happy to help you out.


This is worth a read.


 


http://www.swindonstargazers.com/beginners/eyepieces.htm


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Guest heavensabove

I agree with Andy, what might suit someone else might not work for you. The more money you chuck at it doesn't always guarantee good results either, but it helps.

 

Try some out and see what you think, other members will be happy to help you out.

This is worth a read.

 

http://www.swindonstargazers.com/beginners/eyepieces.htm

Thanks, Baz. I have read that and found it very useful, as were some other entries on eye pieces. 

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Guest heavensabove

The eyepieces supplied will be ok to get you going, but a good eyepiece can make your scope perform so much better. eyepieces can be a very personal thing, best thing to do is come along to a meet and have a try if other people's till you find one that works for you.

Good advice, Andy. I really need to get along to a meet and check some out. Thanks.

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Guest heavensabove

also depends on your budget of course, there can be big difference in prices and range

I've seen the difference in prices, Rob. Quite staggering! I don't think I could afford the top of the range.  :(

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I agree with everything said above EP's can be a very personal thing. Your best bet is to try before you buy. Zoom EP's are quite popular, particularly the baader one. I use baader Hyperion primes myself very good value and very versatile.

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Ep's, tricky subject.

Like mentioned above, what works for one, does not work for another. In the 2 and a half years I've been stargazing, I have been through a few Ep's (not as many as some). I spent just under a year using the stock 10 and 25mm eps that came with the scope, hated the 10mm, the 25mm was ok, next moved onto the Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Zoom, that was a massive improvement over the 2 stock eps but then took a huge leap in improvements and got a 13mm TeleVue Ethos, absolutely stunning ep. If you are into visual, then you really need to spend cash on a good ep, you can then change your scope but keep the ep.

Get to a meet, try some eps, and if you do look through a TeleVue, then prepare your credit card for a battering!

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Guest heavensabove

Darren, I thought the Baader Hyperion was expensive......until I saw The TeleVue Ethos. I wasn't thinking of spending that much on the telescope!  :whew:


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Darren, I thought the Baader Hyperion was expensive......until I saw The TeleVue Ethos. I wasn't thinking of spending that much on the telescope!  :whew:

 

Agreed, they are expensive, but I tried before I purchased (thanks Kim) and I will never go back to another ep, for me, the clarity, the eye relief, all of it is just perfect for me, I`m all ready over half way saving for my next one.  While the ep is more expensive than even my scope, it just goes to show where astro photography requires a good mount, decent ep's does do wonders for visual.

 

One bit of advice, when you get your scope and your are happy with it, get the best ep you can afford, there are good budget ep's out there.

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Guest devil74

Like Daz I cracked on with the stock 10 and 25mm EP's but eventually went for the Vixens..beautiful views. But let me just say this... My first eyepiece upgrade was an 18mm BST (now branded Starguider) off Baz and for 50 quid they are a massive improvement over the stock ones.

As always try before you buy though.

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You don't need to spend big bucks unless you have a very fast scope.

 

Slower scopes are very forgiving on eyepieces.

That's interesting Mick.

 

Is that because slower scopes tend to have a longer focal length and so you are using longer focal length EPs to get the same mag?

 

Guess they may be easier to manufacture, or am I wrong?

 

Cheers

Ade

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Slow scopes have a flatter focal plane then faster scopes, cheap eyepieces have nothing built into them to correct for a curved focal plane. In a slow scope, since the focal plane is nearly flat anyway, this isn't a problem. But in a fast scope, it means that when you have an object in the centre of the field in focus, it may not be in focus at the edges, because the focal plane is curved. Expensive eyepieces such as Televue Naglers are designed to handle curved focal planes that is why you have little sign of coma when using expensive eyepieces.

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Thanks Mick,


 


I would have never worked that one out but understood now  :)


 


Another step along the learning curve....


 


Ade


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Guest fondofchips

It is a balancing act as the type of scope and the best eyepiece for it is a bit tricky, I would agree on trying before you buy 100%.


You will find by using the 10mm & 25mm that you will work out what eyepiece magnification is best for your viewing.


I mainly use a 32mm then 14mm & 8mm if the conditions are good.


As a fellow newbie I still haven't got eyepieces sorted out, over a year after starting the hobby.


Clear skies,


Harry.


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  • 4 months later...

OK I have read the article mentioned above, well skimmed it and haven't really answered my question. A friend suggested that using a Barlow lens was not a good idea and I would be better to buy an eyepiece for larger magnifications because there would be less light loss. The article suggests a  Barlow in many instances, So, as I am new to this game have a 150 Skywatcher reflector (f 750) and was considering a 5mm eyepiece to replace the 10mm and Barlow, am I  wasting my money? I have limited resources but am always looking for  improvement/new experiences so if it isn't this it will be something else. :unsure:


 


Or would it be pushing my scope to far to get something shorter than 5mm?


 


Opinions please.


 


Dennis


Edited by Dennis1954
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Hi Dennis, 200x is about magnification in the UK. Divide your scopes FL (750 or 1000) by the eyepiece size and it will give you the magnification. ie: 10mm ep on a FL of 750 will give you 75x magnification, 5mm will give you 150x etc. I had a 150 PDS and enjoyed using a 20mm,15mm,10mm and a 7mm 0n that scope for different targets.


It also helps to have a larger ep (25-35mm) for setting up and finding tagets then change to a smaller ep.


Hope this is helpful?  :)


 


Cheers


Ron


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Like Ron says it's best if you keep the magnification to 200x max, the atmosphere in this country does not really allow for much higher for visual use. Granted you will hear of people pushing the magnification to 350x or even 400x but that will be once or twice a year at best when the seeing is just perfect. Remember an EP does not only magnify the object you are viewing, it also magnifies all the murk and dew etc between the EP and the object. A 5mm EP on you scope will proberbly be a waste, I would go no lower than a 7 or 8mm EP. BST explorers (now branded Skyguider (I think)) are an excellent upgrade to the stock EP's that ship with the scope and don't cost the Earth, a new one is circa £50 and I just saw an 8mm BST go for sale on ABS for £30. We are only 6-7 weeks away from dark skies returning, at this point the meets should start to pick up a bit. Come along to a meet and have a nosy around, people won't mind you having a look, as I always say to people, try before you buy!

With regards to your point about a Barlow, durys out on that one, some people love them, others don't. I personally don't like using them. Cheap barlows make the viewing worse in my opion and you need to start getting into big money for a decent one, about the best Barlow you can get is a Tal 2x or 3x but they are quite hard to source ( I think), Tele Vue also do a Barlow but your getting into big £ now, their Powermate will blow barlows out of the water but they cost (a lot).

Another thing to watch out for with EP's is what works for one person, will not work for another , FOV, eye relief, exit pupil size ETC, all determine what ep works for you and what doesn't.

Hope this helps?

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Guest Tweedledum

The BST explorers are excellent value for money. I have a 5mm bst which you would be welcome to borrow.


 


In amongst all of ths is the theoretical maximum useful power for your scope this is roughly 2X apperture in mm. ( you have a central obstruction with the secondary mirror)


 


You also need to consider what you would use this power for, as many objects eg M31 are surprisingly large and do  not benefit from large mag.


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I agree with the above advice. Whacking the maximum magnification in really does not do your view any good. I have messed about with different eyepieces, and once the view starts to dim, you lose all detail and clarity. Getting somewhere dark really helps with squeezing out faint detail on Planets, particularly Jupiters GRS, and Mars.


 


Personally, I have used a Tal Barlow, and it works fine for me, but Iam not a purist, in fact I bought a second hand 2" ED Barlow for £25, and it works great.


Horses for courses, go and have a have a look through some eyepieces and Barlows, see what might suit you.


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