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what you can expect to see...


Guest Tweedledum
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Should be in the first article everyone new reads - except for one missing item (for me anyway) - Imagination .


 


Even when seeing that "grey fluffy thing" or the tiny blue spec you can still imagine what that looks like. Yes there are some great pictures taken by AP's but the brain is far superior than PS and Reg etc and doesn't need a computer/USB cables etc. 


 


Still a brilliant summary and should be ,IMHO, put in out sites "library of Info" - with the authors permission of course.


 


:ph34r:


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What a great post !!


 


+ 1 from me  re Red Dwarf  & Stashs comments.


 


I personally found using a bino-viewer was a quantum leap forward for me, particularly when viewing Jupiter & Lunar.


 


Everything looks bigger, better to me when using two eyes.


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Very interesting post. :thumbsup:


 


Some of us still get a big kick out of seeing these tiny, barely visible smudges and dots through an eyepiece. :)


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Hello All


Read this yesterday, in my humble opinion as a newcomer to this Astronomy lark I think this chap is spot on with his comments and observations, certainly with me anyway, its ideal for anyone thinking of taking up astronomy and  unsure what they can or not see and  not to be put off in anyway.


Regards


Rick


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Only constructive criticism I have is that I would expect many beginners to start with 60mm refractors and 76mm reflectors, some of dubious quality and that the views would be even worse. I usually advise people to start off on the Moon and brighter DSOs and to start with binoculars instead of a telescope. An alternative is an 80mm F/5 refractor.


 


I also throroughly recommend solar viewing but am not sure it's a good idea for beginners to do it unsupervised.


 


Not sure I would expect beginners to handle an 8" reflector.


 


The planetary and deep sky descriptions are pretty much spot on but I have seen cloud belts on Venus when close and certainly photographed them. I'm wondering about getting a Calcium K filter if/when I have funds. BTW, anyone got one free to a good home.


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Not sure I would expect beginners to handle an 8" reflector.

 

 

Can I ask why you think this?

 

I only ask as a 8" reflector is what I started out with (and still use, my currant scope is my first scope).

 

I agree with you with regards the bins, they are a cheap great way to get into this wonderful hobby but there are reasons why you might want to start with a 8" reflector, especially on a dob mount.

 

For me, it was cost (not that expensive), the size (not that big) it was all manual which forced me to learn the sky and it is massively easy to use (hardly any parts which could go wrong) and requires next to no set up time.

 

End of the day, its down to personal choice but I think an 8" reflector is a perfect starter scope.

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Can I ask why you think this?

 

I only ask as a 8" reflector is what I started out with (and still use, my currant scope is my first scope).

 

I agree with you with regards the bins, they are a cheap great way to get into this wonderful hobby but there are reasons why you might want to start with a 8" reflector, especially on a dob mount.

 

For me, it was cost (not that expensive), the size (not that big) it was all manual which forced me to learn the sky and it is massively easy to use (hardly any parts which could go wrong) and requires next to no set up time.

 

End of the day, its down to personal choice but I think an 8" reflector is a perfect starter scope.

I agree it is personal choice but in my opinion an 8" Dob has a smaller field of view than a small "vista" refractor, so a beginner would find it harder to find things, especially without a good finderscope. On that subject, I found upgrading to a 9x50 finderscope made a whole world of difference.

 

If money was no object, I would suggest a small APO as a starter 'scope.

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I agree with Phil about an 8" reflector or possibly any reflector not being ideal for some beginners, both for the narrower FOV and a few other complexities. However, some beginners are a bit more savvy than others from day one and would soon read up and get the best from it.

The other day I visited both my local M**lins and Cu**ys. They both had telescopes on display, though I wasn't there to buy one :) The first shop had a 60mm refractor that looked about F20 and a 76mm reflector. The reflector, as we see so many times, was pointing at the floor, and it's polar axis was horizontal. Cu**ys had half a dozen scopes and yet again the reflector was looking at the floor and its polar axis was vertical. What does this say about the retailers product knowledge? Will they explain about collimation and the benefits or otherwise of 600 magnification? A beginner buying a scope from those shops would be like the blind leading the blind. I have heard stories of beginners giving up and sending telescopes back because they couldn't see anything looking through the wrong end or leaving a lens cap on! :) Never mind the fact that they were expecting to see Hubble type views anyway!

Good thing that there is EMS, SGL, other groups and societies and helpful and knowledgeable vendors around to help guide people onto the right path to get the most out of the hobby.

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I agree with Phil about an 8" reflector or possibly any reflector not being ideal for some beginners, both for the narrower FOV and a few other complexities. However, some beginners are a bit more savvy than others from day one and would soon read up and get the best from it.

The other day I visited both my local M**lins and Cu**ys. They both had telescopes on display, though I wasn't there to buy one :) The first shop had a 60mm refractor that looked about F20 and a 76mm reflector. The reflector, as we see so many times, was pointing at the floor, and it's polar axis was horizontal. Cu**ys had half a dozen scopes and yet again the reflector was looking at the floor and its polar axis was vertical. What does this say about the retailers product knowledge? Will they explain about collimation and the benefits or otherwise of 600 magnification? A beginner buying a scope from those shops would be like the blind leading the blind. I have heard stories of beginners giving up and sending telescopes back because they couldn't see anything looking through the wrong end or leaving a lens cap on! :) Never mind the fact that they were expecting to see Hubble type views anyway!

Good thing that there is EMS, SGL, other groups and societies and helpful and knowledgeable vendors around to help guide people onto the right path to get the most out of the hobby.

It goes to show that there actually still is room in the market for a VERY GOOD beginner book that explains how to use a telescope. I've seen some good beginner books about and, indeed, enjoyed reading them BUT most beginner books simply try to do too much. They skip the basics and seem to want to explain the Big Bang, etc. I'm not saying that the Big Bang and cosmology isn't interesting but it won't help one to find Mars and point the right end of the telescope at it!

 

Naturally, I have my own ideas but (so far) haven't found a publisher willing to take it on.

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