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Rocket goes BOOM.


Daz Type-R
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200 million pounds!! + repairs to launch pad. Shame it wasn't due till Wednesday, Nov 5th.

The biggest shame is that there were lots of students experiments on board. I suppose it's a better excuse than the dog ate it.

Edited by tuckstar
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It had the Arkyd satellite (asteroid mining surveyor) and 26 Dove cubesats along with ISS supplies. It's a shame, but I guess suspicion will inevitably fall on the twin AJ26 engines which are - to all intents and purposes - about 50 years old. Basically refurbished from the NK-33 engines built for the Soviet N1 moon rocket which never successfully flew. About 150 of these engines were left after the N-1 was scrapped, Aerojet bought about 30, some have been used in a Soyuz variant. At least they are being put to good use, other N1 body sections were recycled as pig housing! Ironically, the second of the four N-1 launches failed at the same point as Antares did yesterday and in a very similar manner.

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I find it strange that all other technologies have moved forward, but we are still flinging stuff into space with what are essentially vintage rocket motors.


 


They also use the rocket motors to keep boosting the ISS into a higher orbit, as over time this decays. I don't know where this would get critical, but looking at the graph below, it doesn't look like it could stay up without being boosted back up.


 


http://www.heavens-above.com/IssHeight.aspx


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That's the same problem they had with sky lab. The orbit decayed. The shuttle due to take it to higher orbit was delayed due to costs and politics, so no choice but to ditch it in the Indian ocean, and of course all over Australia!!

Edited by tuckstar
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I find it strange that all other technologies have moved forward, but we are still flinging stuff into space with what are essentially vintage rocket motors.

There's a good reason for reusing the NK-33 - it has one on the highest thrust to weight ratios of any rocket engine ever developed - 65% higher than the Saturn F-1. Only one of the new SpaceX Merlin engines is better.

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