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Thinking of selling up....is this normal in the early days?


Seamaster
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I bought my scope and set up (Celestron SLT127 with misc quality eyepieces, solar and moon filters, Tracer 8ah lithium battery etc) only about 4 months ago.

Due to either work commitments (early starts or late finishes or both), other social or family commitments or bad weather, poor or no viewing or combinations of all the above, I have still never even set up and used the set up....at all!

Now I'm beginning to question the wisdom of keeping it just to sit in the spare room, unused from new gathering dust.

I even subscribed to Sky at Night magazine for six months but don't think it's worth continuing as I can never seem to get to do any viewing myself?

I do have an interest in astronomy and have even joined the Derby and District Astronomical Society but again whenever there's anything happening it's either not convenient or possible for me to go or I am knackered and can't be bothered!

Again combined with poor weather calling off most viewing sessions I am not really even getting off the starting block.

My interest is only on a basic, viewing level and I have no interest in making notes or any scientific type observations, just for fun and the thrill of viewing something interesting.

I know the summer months are not supposed to be good for viewing but so far the winters been pants as well?

Also adding to my frustration is the fact that my back garden is pretty much North facing so most of the planets and interesting stuff is blocked by my house....oh and there's a lot of light pollution to!

Is it normal for newbies to experience this disillusionment?

Would I benefit from a "mentor" type buddy locally to help me get fired up and, weather and time permitting actually start to see what I can do with my set up?

Otherwise it's just dead money and I may as well sell up and stick to binos on a casual as and when basis, at least they can be used for other stuff.

Thanks for listening...

Neil.

Derby.

Edited by Seamaster
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Like you said you just need to actually set your gear up and have a look. It's just coming into the season now and you can be out observing quite early. Is there no where near by you could set up. Maybe someone near. Would be a shame to pack up before you begin. Perhaps get some binos before you sell your scope will get you a bit more enthused.

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Hi Neil, it's a tough hobby I will give you that!


 


That's the trouble with this country, the weather, just lately it has been appalling, I have only been out a few times in the last month or so and then not for very long.


 


Also, social commitments, family life and work all play a big part in any hobby, it's just that this hobby requires you to be up at unmentionable hours which does require some dedication, especially after a long day at work.


 


This is the main reason why we say to newbies is to come along to a meet first before you spend the cash, if you cant make the meet, or  the next one, or they get arranged at too short a notice, then unfortunately getting out is not an option but saying that, from what you describe of your back garden, then getting out is the only option.  This may beg the question, is this the right hobby for me?


 


I understand you are caught between a rock and a hard place but I do not really know what else to say, this hobby requires dedication and the will to go outside for a few hours, in the dark, when it's freezing (we must be mad)!!


 


Why not give it another couple of months, really make the effort on the next clear night to get out, who knows, you might love it that much you wondered why you never made the effort before.


 


Good luck!


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It can be a pain when the weather is rubbish and you haven't got time to get out, this is where I find the forum useful as well as social events with folk in my area, but when you do finally bet our the thrill of seeing something for the first time is amazing, especially from a dark site where you see the most stunning details.

I have a obsy set up and I still haven't got out for a while due to the horrible weather so I know where your coming from, why not setup one evening and have an open evening, invite like minded folk round to share and help with the kit and you'll get loads of tips, I've had a couple of evenings when I built my obsy so people could see the efforts I'd made and help others thinking about doing a build, both occasions where poor for visual and imaging but we had a good chat.

Your more than welcome to come and have a go using my gear anytime I'm off.

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I'm with Neil on this!!! fed up of weather, LP and the lugging of gear in and out :o  need an obsy like Rob and wife has said no  :angry:


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Hi Neil, it would be a shame to sell up before you've even had a go.

With a bit of luck the right opportunity will come along soon and let you see what a wonderful hobby this can be. It would definitely be a big advantage to be with other members who can help ensure you get the best possible experience on your first observing session.

At least then you will be able to make a better informed decision as to whether it is right for you.

The rest of us know it is well worth the effort after that really good session, even though they are sometimes few and far between.

As with anything worth doing, there is always that initial pain barrier and learning curve to get through.

Good luck.

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Thanks for the encouragement guys.

Are there any Derby members who fancy an apprentice / Padawan?

Would offer my assistance but i live in Beeston !!! :blush:

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I'm a bit far as well but keep an eye out on the meet section I'm sure we'll be at belper soon. Come along to the long eaton meet on the 19th for a an astro fix to keep you going.

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Just tried looking at the moon with a 12mm eye piece, have to make do at present looking through a double glazed window...at an angle...!

Would that make it impossible to focus as I just can't seem to get it in focus?

Edited by Seamaster
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Guest peepshow

Having spent some few hundred on your gear I wouldn't give up, Neil.


The weather has been bad but not all nights are unusable.


 


Other than the good suggestions given you here, you say your back garden faces North. 


Any chance of using the front drive of the house then on the car hard standing, say, where more of the southern sky


may be seen?  Street lights permitting of course.


 


Maybe some neighbours will see you there and start a conversation about


your scope and you may find a local interest..........  Just a thought.


 


Double glazing is not recommended to look through to the stars, BTW.


 


Good luck.


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Hi, I have considered that but unfortunately I don't have a frontage to speak of, I would be on the pavement and at the mercy of all and any local yobs etc.

We are not in a rough area, just on a popular route for all the kids cutting through our street, I just wouldn't feel comfortable or relaxed.

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Guest fondofchips

It is the peak time for stargazing now Neil so I would stick it out until at least the clock change next spring, from then on the nights get shorter until autumn again.


There is something to look at all year round though.


Scope is not going to work through double glazing as you are looking at targets that are a very big distance away & adding poor quality glass to your scope optics.


You need to be outside in the cold like the rest of us.


The learning curve is very steep at first so press on.  You will gain experience & confidence, setting up will become more easy the more times you do it. 


Try & come to a meeting if possible.  Some very friendly & helpful people on here.


Been stargazing now for 22 months & I still consider myself a newbie.  It does get easier & more rewarding with time.


Clear Skies.


Cheers,


Harry.


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Hi Neil this hits most of us at some time or other, heres my take on it

If I lived in the Sahara and decided to take up carp fishing I am going to be frustrated, similarly I have chosen a hobby/science that requires clear skies but I live on an island that gets the full force of the atlantic weather before anywhere else. So again I must be prepared to put up with poor weather. However on the few nights that I do get observe under a clear sky then the buzz I get from that is usually enough to keep me going to the next time.

Invariably s*ds law dictates that if it is clear other factors interfere which only adds to the frustration, this is something which we all have to come to terms with, its all part oit Im afraid.

Stick with it, get to a meet and get to know your way round the sky then when you have a few clear nights under your belt ask yourself the question re selling up again

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Yup! The window glass will play  havoc with what you are looking at, that and there will be loads of problems with various thermal currents, from the room and inside the scope.


Your scope will need at least an hour outside, so that it all reaches ambient temperature, only then will you get the best views the scope can give you.


Your scope is really good on the Moon and Planets, but this is all a bit washed out when the Moon nears full.


 


We are now in silly season and working all the hours we can, but I am hoping we get some clear skies over the Xmas period. Jupiter will be about, and like the others, I haven't had a good night out since maybe early october.


 


Don't give up yet, when you get a good night, it will keep you buzzing for days, and when you do go out, get wrapped up, and then add more! Getting cold is a real downer, and once you get cold you never get warm again.

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Thanks again guys, I really don't want to give up on this as I've hankered after a scope since I was a kid.

I've given up on tonight though as the light pollution on our development is terrible and thanks to a spat of shed break ins in the summer everyone has Wembley stadium spec flood lights.

I'll charge my Tracer battery up and try to grab some time this weekend to go somewhere dark, if I can find someone to come and providing the weather permits of course!

I lived in rural Nova Scotia for a few months a few years back and the skies there were incredible, the Milky Way as I'd never seen it before!

Back in Derby...well not so good.

I think I need to resign myself to the fact that home viewing is going to be severely limited due to facing the wrong way, too many 3 storey houses and bad light pollution.

I need to get some viewing in soon though to keep me interested!

Edited by Seamaster
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That's the spirit Neil :thumbsup: .

 

You might get something approaching that Nova Scotia experience up at Belper dark site.

I hope so, when is the next one BTW?

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Have a look on this dark sky map, the nearest dark sky to Derby is out on the A52 towards Ashbourne, but you don't have to go far to get acceptable sky.


 


http://www.avex-asso.org/dossiers/wordpress/?page_id=127


 


Go to the "Naked eye map", this is zoomable and you can move around it.


 


Which bit of Derby do you live in?


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Thanks Baz, I am in Shelton Lock, next to Chellaston.

The naked eye map doesn't want to work on my ipad, it just stays all black...unlike the skies here!

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Guest fondofchips

Neighbours security lights - if you can stargaze later then security & other neighbours lights will be less hassle.


It's usually at least 10pm round here before all the lights calm down a bit.  Even better after midnight.


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