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Minimise Moon glare when viewing near (to Moon) objects


stash
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Hi,


 


What is the best way (if any) to stop/limit Lunar glare when viewing  other objects that are in the same area.


 


I guess filters for one?


 


Would flocking stop/limit the Lunar  glare that seems to hit the inside of the tube. (I do have a shroud)


 


Or am I missing something.


 


Hope that makes sense.


 


Thanks


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For visual: "filters" may help but whatever filter you use will likely greatly reduce the light from the object you are looking at too. For faint objects, i'd say wait until the moon is out of the way / less full. A dew shield may help to limit moon light directly pointing down the scope, and flocking may limit the internal reflection of any stray light within the tube, but the hard evidence for the latter is absent in my opinion, but i can see how it should work.

Jd

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If you are talking about objects in the Messier and other catalogues (DSO's - deep space objects), then when the moon has it's full beam on there is very little that you can do. Either try viewing something else that is a far from the moon as you can, or what I have started to do recently, if you can't beat the moon, observe it!

There are filters for observing the moon by reducing its glare, but that will make seeing DSO's impossible.

Also, where dew shields and flocking help with stray light and dew and internal reflections, they will do nothing for the moons glare.

This us why all the major star parties are when there is a new moon or it is below the horizon!

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As already mentioned, the amount of scattered light in the atmosphere (even on a clear night) makes looking for anything other than bright objects almost pointless.


 


So have a look round the Moon, there are loads of interesting features on the surface. Have a go at the Lunar 100, that will ease you into Lunar observing.


 


http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/moon/3308811.html


 


 


As you have a big Dob, then use just the small hole in the front of the main cover, it will make the job a bit more comfortable.


 


http://www.eastmidlandsstargazers.org.uk/topic/7042-why-do-scope-caps-have-smaller-ones-in-them/


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many thanks guys for the info  - just a pain as it was very clear last night - oh well there's always another day . 


 


As you say Darren the moon is pretty interesting especially at the edges just dont fancy going "moon blind" even using filters.


 


Anyway again ta for the info/replies.


 


Daz I have been using www.12dstring.me.uk/astro.htm to pick up the C / M /N list then filtering by time and when viewable sky but will now add the lunar 100 to my lists


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Guest CodnorPaul

The Neodymium filter is supposed to cut moonglow but to be honest I don't see that much difference when the moon is full - but do use it from home all the time as it cuts LP a little and creates better contrast on some objects, as does a UHC filter - but don't expect miracles.


 


Faint DSOs forget it, brighter ones can be found but you wont get the same views as you would on a dark night


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