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Another Messier Link


Guest Tweedledum
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An interesting site but I think the viewing descriptions are highly optimistic! It sounds like they were written by someone in the southern USA from a dark site. M4 with the naked eye? You must be joking! Even my location of Wiltshire is much better than most of you on this board. Has anyone seen M6 or M7 from the East Midlands?


 


Even the northern USA offers an advantage for the southerly Messier objects. M79 is really tough from Wiltshire but was much easier from Chicago.


 


I've seen all Messier objects from my home and many from overseas but it took me 4 years to complete.


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The chap who wrote the site is based in Florida, so I would say his descriptions are sound based on where he has done his viewing.


 


I do not see it as being optimistic, most objects are possible from some location on Earth, depends on the location, sky quality and persons eye sight.


Edited by Daz Type-R
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The chap who wrote the site is based in Florida, so I would say his descriptions are sound based on where he has done his viewing.

 

I do not see it as being optimistic, most objects are possible from some location on Earth, depends on the location, sky quality and persons eye sight.

I have read a lot of descriptions of various objects in books and magazines and nearly all of them rely on an experienced observer from a dark site. In beginner books this can be very misleading. Most of my observing is done from suburban skies, even when I have travelled.

 

Realistically, most observers will live in urban or suburban areas and may not have a dark site that is safe.

 

I'd say most Messier objects are fuzzy objects that could be almost anything but when I researched the list, I found some that were pure eye candy through my modest equipment. M34, M35 and M101, for example are well worth a visit with a telescope.

 

I notice that you have bagged M76, which is (in my opinion) the hardest. It was ideally placed and on an exceptionally clear night when I saw it. I could not see it in my binoculars but could see it in my 5" Mak. Had I not known where it was, it was just a faint fuzzy blob.

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My own funny anecdote was when I thought I'd spotted a new comet, only to discover that M92 was especially bright that night, due to an exceptionally clear sky. Were it not for Messrs Messier and Mechain, I may well have made a bigger fool of myself than usual.


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